Dust Boot withouth machine modifications

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Dust Boot withouth machine modifications

Postby Kayvon » Sun Apr 02, 2017 10:01 am

I wanted a dust boot for my Shark, but I'm still shy about modifying the machine. To date, all the dust boots I've seen require modifying the machine in some way--replacing bolts, spacers, clamps, etc. I figured out a way to attach the boot securely to the existing bolts protruding from underneath using T-nuts. No permanent modifications required, the boot can be attached/removed quickly and easily, and it looks slick, too!

More pictures, a short build log, and further description available here: http://perryprojects.blogspot.com/2017/ ... -boot.html

The attached project file works with the baseline Shark model. You'd need to take measurements to see if it'll work for other models, though I suspect the same principles will still apply.
Attachments
2 Second prototype.jpg
Prototype showing T-nut assembly
9 Attached.jpg
Final product
dust_boot.crv
VCarve project file
(325 KiB) Downloaded 103 times
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Kayvon
 
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Re: Dust Boot withouth machine modifications

Postby Rando » Sun Apr 02, 2017 11:32 am

First, I gotta say: THANK YOU for putting in a static drain wire :D

That is a nice setup, but I have a question: what odd, layered material is that you're using? It's like no HDPE or metal I've seen; must be like a biological composite? Very eco! :mrgreen:

After our mention of the "no modifications, only additions" the other day, I can see your point. And indeed, even with mine, they are all attachments; I haven't yet **replaced** any function that was on the machine. Well, except I hacked the controller box internal parts placement and wire routing. And the fan. I did do the fan. And the static drain-wire system. And the touch-probe polarity. And the X-Y axis swap. Bloody hell...okay, I guess I **do** make actual modifications. The thing sat not working on my dining room table for four months while I wrestled that controller into working. (it's an EE thing) When it was all over, I had a reliable system, but one so far out of warranty I'd pay them to not force me to ship it to them! No, seriously, I did. Instead of allowing them to replace the controller board under warranty, after I'd literally hacked it with a soldering iron and x-acto knife for four months until it worked, I then paid for a new board...that I could modify with just the changes needed. Just because it started out dead doesn't mean I didn't torture it :D.

Back on subject: thanks for posting, Kayvon. It's a nice simple design others can use. I notice the NORMAL sized hose port. I never understood why the NWA one had the huge opening when the down draft from the router blew chips out of the boot if there was space, but it interfered with the z-axis travel when the bristles were in contact. Useless, IMO, and absolutely useless when trying to cut a metal...chips are blown across the entire room.

There it is! Thanks for also posting the CRV, Kayvon. Fully awesome!

Regards,

Thom
=====================================================
ThomR.com Creative tools and photographic art
A proud member of the Pacific Northwest CNC Club (now on Facebook)
Rando
 
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Re: Dust Boot withouth machine modifications

Postby Kayvon » Sun Apr 02, 2017 1:21 pm

I'm an EE as well, so I always appreciate your thoughtful approach to solving problems. I'd be interested in knowning what modifications you've made to the control box, if you're willing to share.

I used to focus primarily on microcontroller projects, but lately more emphasis has gone to CNC work. Outside of cutting a PCB, the two passions don't cross paths as much as they should. I'm sure there's some untapped potential there.
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Re: Dust Boot withouth machine modifications

Postby Rando » Sun Apr 02, 2017 11:06 pm

during the 4 months it wouldn't work reliably--often not at all--I "applied my technical skills" to it.

The biggest change, IMO, was rotating the power supply inside the case (barely fits that way), then moving the controller board to the far side of the power supply, away from the router-motor relay. Why? Because in the original configuration they run the router's 120V motor cable directly over the uCtrlr chip. (as in 1/4" directly above). That required modifying the metal of the box so that the connectors could come out that way. It also meant that the DB grounding studs no longer connect to the frame ground...THERE.

I then modified the grounding (in addition to the metal-box change) so that the grounding wires from the stepper motors didn't first connect to the digital ground. Sure, that makes sense when they're a shield, but their bizarre non-grounding of the bed leads to huge static discharges that can be seen on the digital ground, that make their way to the steppers whenever the hapless human touches one of the motor bodies during, say, an HDPE cut. So, I routed the static around the board and to the chassis, then the digital board just got it's normal K-contact.

I added a fan, since the stepper motor drivers get quite hot during normal use. At one point one even went into into some over-temp protection mode, rr something; one motor driver just cut out on a long (LONG) run, and then it came back on just fine after it cooled. Adding the fan, never had a problem since.

I added a circuit to output the router-motor-relay control signal out to my crazy-ass power-control box :D. Yeah, it should have been all opto-this and that, but I was lazy that day ;-).

Because of the static drain wiring changes I made (a tip to the knowledgeable: 410K required bed-to-chassis ground; otherwise it interferes with the z probing). The touch panel couldn't be used directly on the bed, since the polarity has "ground" the spindle, and the "voltage" on the bed...which means that a grounded bed won't work. So, I reversed the polarity, and now I don't even need to use the touch plate; I touch off to the material, with an 0.020" plate to compensate for the Z-height error in the controller.

Of course, I changed the X- and Y-axis cables, but that isn't a "change" inside the box per se, right?

In addition, the laptop I use beside the machine is not actually the computer running the control panel software. That computer is about 30 feet away in another room, away from electrical noise. I use a Silex USB device remote server over wired 1Gb ethernet to connect to the controller, and I use a remote-terminal session from the laptop to the actual controlling computer. That way, the laptop can completely die if it wants (a hand saw fell on it once, DURING a cut!) and the CNC will not be affected.

Okay, I'll stop :D.

Regards,

Thom
=====================================================
ThomR.com Creative tools and photographic art
A proud member of the Pacific Northwest CNC Club (now on Facebook)
Rando
 
Posts: 583
Joined: Tue Jan 06, 2015 3:24 pm
Location: Hoquiam, WA


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